How To Do It

So how do you do it? When life’s so full, how do you do the big things that make the difference? Here’s the easiest way to “get the answer”: one of Stephen Covey’s famous Seven Habits. Sorry, it’s very American, but you get the picture…

We’ve long studied these habits at Crealy. One winter, we took time out each week to visit and revisit these seven principles -starting with “Seek First to Understand”, working through “Put First Things First” and the rest.

All of these need one thing, though:

“The most important success principle of all was stated by Thomas Huxley many years ago. He said, “Do what you should do, when you should do it, whether you feel like it or not.”Brian Tracy quoting Kop Kopmeyer quoting Thomas Huxley.

And what is success? What is wealth? Well, for me it’s being able to be myself. That’s all. It’s not about money. It’s about not having to conform to what someone else’s idea of “me” is. That doesn’t mean I don’t care what other people think. I care deeply – we all do. But I do now have the luxury of living as I want, with who I want, where I want, how I want. And that’s such a great gift that I think I’ll spend the rest of my life working to deserve such great richness, such wealth of opportunity and freedom.

Of course, we never have it all. It would be lovely to have all our family with us in Australia, for instance. And we miss all our friends at Crealy hugely. And our horses, all the goats and their kids, the Devon hedgerows, cream teas, Mum’s cooking… no, we never have it all.

We are all interconnected. All dependent on each other. Each of us and the world at large. And the more freedom I have, the more I realise and appreciate that inter-dependence. And love it. And do my best to live up to it. So here’s a gift to you today: the reminder that whatever it is that’ll make you most happy right now (the project completed, the work finished, the house clean, the children content, time with your partner, alone on the beach, disappearing into a good book, time out to meditate…) – whatever it is, all you have to do is…

“Do what you should do, when you should do it, whether you feel like it or not.”


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2 Responses
  1. nigel hembury says:

    I am so disappointed that you use the rude term flat earthers to describe people who want to see a proper debate there is no consensus you should look at some real peer reviewed papers not the rubbish the press put out here is a link to a large amount of proper science from some of the worlds most respected scientists they are not flat earthers

    http://petesplace-peter.blogspot.com/2008/04/peer-reviewed-articles-skeptical-of-man.html

    this warming was forecast last year as they knew of the build up to aonal El Nino Southern Oscillation that year. Two similarly severe El Ninos over the past 250 years also caused done the same . “Global warming” was nothing to do with it then or now
    Also look at these lies spread by the British government .

    http://scienceandpublicpolicy.org/monckton/goreerrors.html

    • Angela says:

      Dear Nigel, thanks for your post and apologies both for inadvertently offending you and also for being so slow to reply. Your links are really interesting so I’m glad to have the chance to review these. I certainly didn’t mean to imply that people who want to genuinely debate are “flat earthers”. I too don’t believe that climate change is just man-made – instead, I was using “flat earthers” (poor choice of phrase probably) to mean the people who deny the climate changes at all. So I completely agree with you that the climate does of course change over the aeons that the earth’s been in existence, including in more recent history. But there is no doubt that man’s impact on top of these natural changes is making a significant difference too. In fact, the pollution and habitat destruction globally as a result of poorly planned human activities in addition to natural events is most likely having severe affects in the short-term, unless wide-scale human activity is moved to more conscious ways of living with less detrimental affects on the planet. Respected organisations such as WWF and Greenpeace repeatedly prove this to be the case and call for urgent action.

      I suppose I am most concerned with “pollution reduction” and “habitat protection” rather than “climate change”, which can be an over-simplistic shorthand. To me, it seems nothing short of rude to pollute and waste, indescribably tragic that the survival of every single one of the world’s large species are under threat in the wild due to habitat reduction.

      You are totally right that the debate needs to be rigorous and open. We know that governments and the media are far from transparent – unfortunately the media is often focussed more on circulation and viewer numbers in order to sell the advertising which is the main income source, as opposed to delivering honest “news”, while governments can become more concerned on the power/control mix instead of best serving humanity.

      Having said all that, I have the utmost faith that all will be well. Sydney Smith puts it better than I can, “Why destroy your present happiness by a distant misery, which may never come at all? For every substantial grief has twenty shadows and most of the shadows are of your own making”.

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